Stellarium – Find the Humanity Star

A new satellite called the Humanity Star looks like a disco ball

Looking for information on how to track the Humanity Star location using Stellarium astronomy software?

Here is a quick tutorial on how to find the Humanity Star using Stellarium.

You can track the position of the Humanity Star with Stellarium
The Humanity Star satellite before launch – still on the Earth.

Rocket Lab founder and CEO Peter Beck announced that the company’s rocket had placed a special satellite in a 90 minute orbit around the Earth.

A lot of people want to see this new “star” in the sky. Stellarium can help you do that.

If you don’t have Stellarium, you can download a copy here. And I have a few tutorials that can help you get started with this amazing piece of software.

Tutorial – use Stellarium to find the Humanity Star satellite

First, you have to use the satellite database which is available in the Configurations > Plugins section of Stellarium.

Click on the wrench with the star, then click the Plugins tab, then scroll down until you see “Satellites” in the list on the left.

Stellarium configuration panels showing the satellites plugin which is needed to track the Humanity Star (it is a satellite after all)
Stellarium configuration window showing the satellites plugin.

Update the satellite data

Once you have done that (be sure to check “Load at startup” you will have a list of satellites to choose from. However, there are new objects launched into space every day, so this plugin has a button that says “Update Now”

Stellarium can hep you find the Humanity Star
Update the satellite list to get all the newest satellites – including the Humanity Star.

Search for the Humanity Star

Now, open the Search panel in Stellarium and type Humanity Star and hit the return key on the keyboard or click the magnifying glass button.

Stellarium search panel showing the Humanity Star as a findable object
Open the Search panel and type Humanity Star. Stellarium will find it.

Stellarium will highlight the Humanity Star. Hit the space bar to lock it into the view.

Time lapse

Now that Stellarium has locked the Humanity Star into the view center. You can speed up time by tapping the “L” key on the keyboard a few times. This will speed up the clock and show you where the Humanity Star is traveling in the sky.

Stellarium Humanity Star in the Constellation Cygnus in March 2018
Stellarium Humanity Star in the Constellation Cygnus in March 2018 as seen from the New York Metropolitan Area.

Predicting the brightness (magnitude) of the Humanity Star

By using this website, you can enter your location on Earth (in the top right of the page choose Location) and track many satellites and get predictions for when they will fly overhead.

The Humanity Star is one of several “satellites of special interest” so you can click on the link and see flyover predictions with magnitude estimates.

According to the satellite tracking website “Heavens Above” the Humanity Star is not one of the brightest objects in the sky. In the second week of March 2018, it ranges from magnitude 4.1 to 8.4. Magnitude 4.1 is just barely visible to the naked eye in light polluted suburban skies, but magnitude 8.4 is basically invisible under all normal viewing conditions.

This table shows the visibility and brightness prediction for the Humanity Star satellite
Table of predictions for the New York metropolitan area Humanity Star visibility and brightness.

I would love to hear if you were able to use these directions to find and see the Humanity Star in your area!

Clear Skies. Happy Humanity Star satellite hunting with Stellarium.

Stellarium – a Gift to Humanity

Hello! Are you looking for information on how to use Stellarium to find the Humanity Star satellite? It’s your lucky day! Click here for a tutorial that teaches you how to find the Humanity Star satellite with Stellarium.

Or continue reading to find out more about Stellarium.

An image of the winter sky showing the Full Moon near the constellations Orion, Taurus, the Big Dog (with the bright star Sirius), and the Little Dog (with the bright star Procyon).
An image of the winter sky showing the Full Moon near the constellations Orion, Taurus, the Big Dog (with the bright star Sirius), and the Little Dog (with the bright star Procyon).

Stellarium – a glorious gift to Humanity in software form – gives you super powers. And best of all … It’s FREE!

Superpowers!

Always wanted to know the names of the stars and constellations? You can search, play, pan and zoom, examine, compare and anchor your knowledge.

It’s a cloudy night? No problem. You can see through the clouds! 

Wished that the sky had labels on everything? Stellarium has 10 different label types.

Stop time? Move time by day, by week? Do you want to see what will happen in 2 months? Or look at the sky during the Pharoah’s reign? You can time travel.

You can easily drag and zoom, stop time, go in reverse, make a timelapse, follow the moon through its phases. You have a tool to help you understand the ecliptic and sidereal time and retrograde motion. You can see the great orbital swing of Venus as it circles the Sun.

Ok! I’m convinced by your Stellarium review. What should I do now? What’s my call to action?

Get a copy of Stellarium.

You can download it here.

Stellarium is a free, easy to use, and powerful tool – and best of all (did I mention this already?) it’s FREE and easy to use.

I will write some specific tutorials about my favorite parts of Stellarium in 2017, but for now… go get it and play!

You will be able to see things about sky objects and movements that are impossible to see live. But, once you have seen them with the help of Stellarium, the sky will open up for you – like a gift.